Imagine if one day capitalism reaches the point, where the big brands starts to sponsor the superheroes. How would this influence their images? That’s the question that Roberto Vergati Santos invites with his Sponsored Heroes series. Based on this hypothesis, he decided to experiment with some characters, and see what would be the results of such idea. Santos takes images of familiar superheroes from movies, television, and comics, and assigns each one a brand. It’s a simple execution, but one that forces us to contemplate how easy it could be to see superpowered folks sporting Adidas exclusively or earning a little extra income from Red Bull. What happens when superheroes stop fighting for the American way and start fighting for the American corporation?
Superheroes have to pay the bills, after all, and superheroics isn’t really that lucrative.





Roman AlexandruAbout the Author: Adriana King

I’m a 24-year old independent graphic artist, blogger and author. I write and handle the promotional activity for Mashable Magazine. I really love what I do! Follow me on Facebook.



  • Ariel says:

    Actually Iron Man was sponsored by Burger King. http://ironman.wikia.com/wiki/Burger_King

  • Maximus says:

    I’m suddenly craving a “Coca Cola Light” for some reason.

  • Platypus says:

    The end result is pretty good, but you’d think Red Bull would sponsor Angel or some other winged superhero. Flash is fast, but he doesn’t really push the whole “gives you wings” mentality.
    But yeah, looks alright.

  • bluearcher says:

    I just wanted to say, that costumes with too much corporate sponsorships will end up looking like NASCAR race gear. Captain Amazing and Booster Gold prove my point.

  • KLR_Steve says:

    Iron Man is already sponsored by Stark Industries.

  • BlueBeard says:

    I love Red Bull for Flash, but whoever put coke on Captain America instead of Pepsi was really not thinking very hard. In fact, I think that red Captain America came right off a cracked PS contest where they made him Captain Canada.

  • vidvamp01 says:

    I wouldn’t call movies/superheroes corporate shills. Sponsorship is a vital part of keeping down production costs. Most of the time it’s not all that obvious and it’s usually unobtrusive so I don’t mind. It is pretty much the way most motion-visual entertainment (TV, movies) is funded.

  • Rayken W says:

    I have zero problem with product placement as long as it is no more blatant than what we have in real life. Tony Stark drove an Acura… and? The script called for him to drive a car, so…?

  • Daniel M. Clark says:

    Replace superheroes with movies, I agree. I remember when product placement was less obtrusive. but I guess since the corps will pay for the advertising and the market research shows purchases go up, there’s not much we can do

  • Jack says:

    Uh, superheroes already are corporate shills. The Avengers had 18 product placements in it. Tony Stark and the rest of the Marvel universe is driving an Acura. Superman Returns had at least 16 products featured. Metropolis looked like it had one brand in electronics: Samsung.